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Big Girls Need Love Too

It’s true that big girls need love too and this 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst 440 TNT is easy to love. Sure, the 300 Hurst edition didn’t offer anything that a Newport with a 440 could not insofar as performance was concerned, but it was a pretty nice styling package and I bet these things were killer highway cruisers. Nonetheless, here’s a story about a particular barn find and how two major automotive manufacturers dropped the ball and forgot to market it.

It is essential to be able to keep a secret. That is unless you are a car maker who is trying to market a Special Edition vehicle. That is when secrecy can lead to sales death. That is part of the story behind the Chrysler 300 Hurst Edition. Circumstances contrived to make this car a virtual unknown when it was new, but one whose popularity has grown over the years. This particular example is a tidy and original survivor that is looking for a new home. It is located in Blue Ridge, Texas, and is listed for sale here on eBay. The BIN for the classic Chrysler has been set at $39,500. However, there is the option available to make an offer.

By 1970, muscle and pony car sales in America were looking healthy, but Chrysler perceived an untapped gap in its range. The last of the 300 “Letter Series” cars had rolled off the line in 1965. This marked the end of a badge that had first surfaced in 1955. Ford was experiencing decent sales in the Personal Luxury segment with the Thunderbird, so Chrysler decided to join the party in 1970 with the 300 Hurst Edition. The concept was excellent in both theory and execution, but as we shall see, it failed in one key area. Chrysler decided to enlist the help of Hurst to produce the vehicles…. read more >

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