faq

covid-19 faq

Despite being printed on demand, we normally ship most shirt orders out within 48-hours, but due to the COVID-19 situation, staff on the floor, stock deliveries, and shipment pickups have all been reduced, so like everyone else, we’re doing our best to keep everything moving, it’s just a little slower than usual. Our apologies for the delay, but truly appreciate your business and your understanding as we all work through these unprecedented times.

Man, is it ever. Before all of this mess started, we got orders printed and out the door in just a 2 – 3 days on average, but due to the reverberating effects of the shutdowns, we’re now 10 – 20 days. Yes, some orders are still getting out in a few days, but only when the stars align and the base shirt size and color are on the shelf, the printers are supplied and ready, and the shipment is picked up sooner than later.

When everything closed at the start of the COVID-19 situation, it created a series of backups that are just now starting to begin moving again. Our primary fulfillment partners (two different companies) are in California and they’re STILL not allowed to operate, so they’ve been running out of their auxiliary facilities in other states, but we are hearing they will be allowed to reopen soon.

The secondary issue is that upstream suppliers are in the same boat – closed for two weeks or so and not allowed to operate in California – so now there’s a backup in getting inks and other supplies needed for the DTG printers as well as the blank garments which is across the board as we print on several brands of shirts and they’re all behind.

To make matters worse, instead of four pickup and delivery stops by our shippers, the fulfillment centers are only getting one or two these days.

We do sell through a few select shops, both online and brick and mortar locations, but these shops buy wholesale and have physical inventory sitting on their shelves. This is s a good place to be right now, but even then, they will eventually run into the same issues of supply chain delays when it comes time to reorder from us or any other company they may be buying from in one way or another.

general faq

Not sure what size is your best fit? We recommend taking one of your current t-shirts, laying it flat and measuring it. The measurements in the charts on each respective shirt’s product page are taken with the shirt laying on a flat surface. To get the length, measure from the high shoulder point down to the bottom of the shirt. To get the width, measure approximately 1-inch below the armhole, across the chest, from seam to seam. While our tees are all made using premium, pre-shrunk, ring-spun cotton, there can be some shrinkage depending on your personal wash and dry cycles. With that said, if you’re on the fence, we always suggest going up a size 😎

For years, we screen printed all of our shirts and not to toot our own horn too much, but we were masters of it and capable of doing some pretty amazing things when it came to creating our vintage inspired, distressed designs. This however always had its limitations and as Direct-to-garment (DTG) printing starting to come about, we watched it with a keen eye until the technology finally hit its stride and had our full attention. So no, we no longer screen print anything, even for custom orders as we’ve fully embraced DTG and aren’t looking back.

Direct-to-garment, or DTG, is a printing method that sprays the ink onto the garment. The ink then soaks into the fibers of the garment. It’s like printing on paper, but on clothing. DTG is a more sustainable process than screen printing, primarily because printing on demand allows businesses to avoid overproduction and textile waste and with 92 million tons of textile going to waste in the fashion industry each year, DTG can make a HUGE impact. Secondly, DTG printing uses considerably less water and chemicals in the printing process. Even the inks themselves are water-based and far safer for the environment than commercial screenprinting inks.

Modern direct-to-garment, or DTG printing has allowed us to go from making pretty cool distressed designs through screen printing to making highly detailed, over the top vintage designs that are truly wearable works of art. All of our designs are printed on state of the art Kornit DTG printers that can take whatever we throw at them, no matter how ridiculously detailed, and make it a reality and THAT is why we chose DTG over screen printing.

Specific shirt details are included on every product page, but here’s a quick overview. Men’s/unisex shirts are printed on Bella+Canvas 3001 tees, women’s are run on Next Level 3900 tees, and kid’s are printed on Delta 11736 tees. After countless test runs, samples, and wear and tear tests, we counted these among the best fitting, softest feeling, and longest waering tees on the market, but more about that below.

We decided on the garments that we sell based on a combination of size and color availability, coupled with feedback on the fit and feel from customers. While we would love to use one brand exclusively just to make things easier on ourselves, each manufacturer has their strong suit, and we believe that we’ve found them after countless test runs, sample orders, and wear and tear testing.

We totally get that you may have a favorite shirt from another brand, but not all shirts are created equally and this is especially true when it comes to high-end DTG printing. It takes a considerable amount of time working with manufacturers and printers to find that sweet spot that results in a high quality printed garment, so this won’t ever be an option and anyone who says that they’ll do it is prepared to give you a mediocre product.

Your new shirt is ready to wash and wear as soon as it’s in your hands, so no need to do anything weird to ‘break it in’ or anything like that. All of our shirts come with the manufacturer’s care tag, so definitely defer to that, but below are some general guidelines.  

High-quality cotton is super durable, which makes it less prone to accidental rips or tears. However, cotton isn’t as durable as polyester or cotton/polyester blends. Just like most natural materials, it can shrink when subjected to high temperatures. So when washing a cotton shirt, use cold water and avoid adding too much detergent as doing so can affect the wear and tear of the material. Choose delicate cycle setting on your washing machine to prevent color fading. 

Polyester is very durable, more so than cotton and most blended fabrics. It’s also difficult to stain permanently because polyester is less absorbent than most fabrics. Polyester fabrics are also known for their resistance to wrinkling, shrinking and fading when properly taken care of. That said, it’s recommended to machine wash polyester garments in warm water with all-purpose detergent, then follow up with tumble-dry at a low-temperature setting.

All garments experience some shrinkage, even premium quality pre-shrunk shirts like ours. Just like most natural materials, it can shrink when subjected to high temperatures, so when washing a cotton shirt, use cold water and avoid adding too much detergent as doing so can affect the wear and tear of the material.