Shopping Cart

Frankenstein’s Monster

One of the ways in which Frankenstein’s monster demonstrates his eloquence is by alluding to John Milton’s Paradise Lost, one of the books he reads while living in the peasants’ hovel (described later in the monster’s narrative). The first of these allusions occur in these chapters when the monster tries to convince Victor to listen to his story. He entreats Victor to “remember, that I am thy creature: I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel.” By comparing Victor to God, the monster heaps responsibility for his evil actions upon Victor, scolding him for his neglectful failure to provide a nourishing environment.

from the shop

Drop your email addy to subscribe to our occasional newsletter with a few blog posts, new designs, and even coupon codes and deals.

Stone Dead Forever

Lemmy and Gaye Advert of ‘The Adverts’ walking London’s Soho District in back in ’77. #Lemmy #MotorheadMonday #1977 #London #Soho #DenmarkStreet #Motorhead #StoneDeadForever #Vintage #Psyne

Read More »
Psyne Co.